Sermon

Easter 5 - David Urion (5/19/19)

Easter 5 - David Urion (5/19/19)

“If we think about it much at all, the Book of Revelation gives us some pause and discomfort as well-behaved, reserved, decorous Anglicans. Filled with strange images and stories, it’s all a bit too hallucinatory to be entirely comfortable for us. This, it would seem, is the stuff of holy rollers and snake handlers. So how on earth—or heaven, for that matter—are we to understand this book and its messages?”

Easter Sunday - Kate Elledge (4/21/19)

Easter Sunday - Kate Elledge (4/21/19)

“Easter rocks. Easter is a cool holiday. And no, not all holidays are cool. I think we can all admit that Trinity Sunday is boring. Labor Day celebrates work. But Easter—Easter we celebrate Jesus’ victory over death itself. That is boss! That’s enough to make anyone say, ‘Alleluia!’ But did you notice—nobody actually says that in the gospel that we just heard? There’s not even a tasteful Episcopalian ‘woohoo!’ You get the picture that what we think when we picture that empty tomb is not what they thought when they saw the empty tomb.“

Good Friday - David Urion (4/19/19)

Good Friday - David Urion (4/19/19)

“This Gospel we hear, year after year, is an extraordinarily rich one. Today, I would like to stop and linger on the encounter between Pontius Pilate, Prefect of Judea, and the rabbi Yeshua ben Joseph, as they would have known each other. This is a story set in a particular time and place, but one that I think is remarkably applicable to our time. It’s a story of an encounter between two kinds of power, and two people who had very different understandings of the nature of the universe and this world and the humans who inhabit them…It is a story of a tyrant and a bully confronting something he cannot understand. It is therefore a story for our time.”

Palm Sunday - Greg Johnston (4/14/19)

Palm Sunday - Greg Johnston (4/14/19)

“If Easter is just a fairy tale—if Jesus’ death and resurrection is just a parable from which we have to extract some kind of spiritual or ethical meaning—then I’m not sure that Palm Sunday is worth celebrating with a parade. But if Jesus is our Harry Potter—if Jesus is the one who faces his own death to free us from Death—then Palm Sunday is final opportunity to cheer him on.”

Lent 5 - Kate Elledge (4/7/19)

Lent 5 - Kate Elledge (4/7/19)

“So, I am a huge fan of both the Marvel and DC universes. I know that makes me anathema with certain purists everywhere, but I cannot choose between Captain Marvel and Wonder Woman. They’re both awesome…And given the gajillion dollars people have spent on DC and Marvel films, I’m clearly not the only one who likes superheroes and supervillains…Well, I think maybe John the Evangelist was also a fan of superheroes and supervillains.”

Lent 4 - Kate Elledge (3/31/19)

Lent 4 - Kate Elledge (3/31/19)

“If you’re in Sunday School normally, what do you call that? ‘The Loving Father,’ I love that. What did the rest of us learn the title of this was? ‘The Prodigal Son,’ exactly. And how fitting is it? It’s not really the prodigal son’s story, is it? This is a parable about a dutiful son. But of course the younger son got the title, just like he got the party, and the fatted calf, and the ring and the sandals and the father’s love and attention. Is that fair? No! Admit it! It’s not fair at all.”

Lent 3 - John Finley (3/24/19)

Lent 3 - John Finley (3/24/19)

“In thinking about humility, I was remembering the personal experience I had at the gym with a muscle-bound personal trainer trying to sell me on getting a ‘Fit 3D Scan.’…I explained to my friend that I already knew that I had an unrealistic body image; I also think I’m smarter than I am, kinder, more generous. This web of self-deception is precious and dear to me! I did not get that scan. On the other hand, I do believe that God scans me inside and out. But that’s different, because I know that God really loves me.“

Epiphany 4 - Kate Elledge (2/3/19)

Epiphany 4 - Kate Elledge (2/3/19)

“‘Love is patient, love is kind...‘ Since we only hear it at weddings, we might forget that St. Paul didn’t actually write that letter to a bride and groom. He wrote it to the Corinthian church. He wasn’t giving instructions on how to live together in wedded bliss. He was giving instructions on how to live together as a parish, and that’s worth thinking about, maybe once every three years, or maybe before you attend an Annual Meeting.”